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Sunrooms offer a place where you can enjoy outdoor views and sunlight without actually being outside. Whether you’re avoiding the summer heat or staying warm in winter, you can still get plenty of natural light in a comfortable environment with a sunroom. Since these are different types of sunrooms to choose from, it’s important to become familiar with what each type offers. This can help you determine which sunroom is ideal for your home. 

3 Season Sunrooms

A 3 season sunroom is one that usually doesn’t have any heating or cooling from your home’s HVAC system. This type of sunroom is a suitable option if you live in a warmer climate with a low number of freezing or below freezing days. With this type of sunroom, you can get plenty of use out of it all year round. Keep in mind that you might need to use other means of heating or cooling it if needed, such as with space heaters or oscillating fans. 

4 Season Sunrooms

A 4 season sunroom, also known as an all season sunroom, differs from a 3 season sunroom in terms of heating and cooling. With this kind of sunroom, you can have your home’s HVAC system supply it with cool or warm air as needed. These sunrooms also typically have insulation added for additional comfort. This setup allows you to use your 4 season sunroom all year round without having to worry about whether or not it’s warm or cool enough. 

Solariums

Solariums are sunrooms that feature all glass, even on the ceiling. These sunrooms typically have straight or curved panes of glass where the walls and roof meet. This type of sunroom is ideal if you want to be able to see all around you, since solariums offer optimal views of your surroundings on all sides. You’ll also be getting more sunlight overall in a solarium with its glass ceiling and full glass walls. 

Conservatories

Conservatories are known for adding a certain historic charm to high-end homes. These luxurious sunrooms typically have segmented roofs with either glass panes or polycarbonate material, giving you the option to add more or less natural light overall depending on your preference. A conservatory is a good option when you want a sunroom with a more vintage or classic look rather than the more modern or contemporary style and appearance that solariums, 3 season sunrooms and 4 season sunrooms offer. 

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According to a report by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, more than 25 million people in the US live with asthma. The most common type is allergic asthma. With that in mind, improving the quality of air in your home is an important consideration. When the air quality in your home is good, it can reduce common symptoms like shortness of breath, red eyes, and wheezing.

Allergens in your home like pollen, pest droppings, dust mites, and pet dander often aggravate asthma symptoms. HVAC systems are built to filter these allergens but if the system is not optimized, it could do more harm than good. 

Here are four basic but effective ways to allergy-proof your HVAC system:

Schedule annual maintenance

Schedule a visit with a licensed professional every year to ensure your HVAC system is running clean and efficient. Ensure the service call includes replacing air filters and cleaning ductwork.

Clean or replace your HVAC filters

A typical HVAC filter should be deep cleaned every two to three months. A HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter does not need to be cleaned as often, upgrade to save some maintenance time. Generally, a filter must get rid of at least 99.97% of the contaminants in the air to acquire a HEPA rating. If you choose a HEPA filter, select one with a MERV rating of at least 10. MERV ratings grade the quality of the air filtration on a scale from 1 (lowest) to 20 (highest). The higher the score, then the more satisfying the quality of the air. 

Run your HVAC system regularly

Run your HVAC system for at least 30 minutes each day to help with air circulation. The air conditioner moves air in your home by bringing in the fresh outdoor air. If you own a smart thermostat, consider programming your system to run at a specific time and duration.

Install a UV light near your HVAC evaporator

An HVAC contractor can help you install a UV light close to your system’s evaporator. A UV light can control mold growth and other bio-organisms that might be present in your HVAC unit.

For more effective ways on how to allergy-proof your HVAC system, contact a professional HVAC contractor. Let your professional real estate agent know if you’ve optimized your HVAC system for allergen control.

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